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600 GPs face losing their licence to practise, says GMC

The GMC has confirmed that 600 GPs have not responded to requests from the regulator to provide information for their revalidation and have been told that their licence to practise is ‘at risk’.

The GPs have have 28 days to either confirm their designated body or tell the GMC they do not have one. If they fail to respond the GMC says it ‘will have to take steps to remove their licence to practise’.

Pulse revealed last month that more than 8,500 doctors face having their licence to practise removed by the GMC for failing to respond to communications regarding revalidation.

This number has now reduced to 7,818 doctors, and they will receive a final notice letter from the GMC this week.

The GMC wrote to 54,000 doctors last year as part of its Make your connection campaign, asking them to confirm their designated body - the organisation that will help them to revalidate.

The GMC says it has written to these doctors several times asking them to get in touch - most recently in January 2013, when all doctors were given their revalidation date.

Over 50% of the doctors written to have overseas addresses and almost 15% are over the age of 65, which may mean they are not currently working in the UK.

Niall Dickson, GMC chief executive, said: ‘Revalidation has started well - so far we have revalidated more than 18,500 doctors. To help doctors, we are committed to keeping in close contact with them, particularly in these early days.

‘We know that doctors are busy and some may have found it difficult to come back to us with the information we haveasked for. We also know that many of the doctors who have not responded are working overseas or have retired so may have chosen not to respond. 

‘For those doctors who want to keep practising in the UK, they must get back to us so we can help them with their revalidation. We have a dedicated team ready and waiting to help - all they need to do is call us.’

Readers' comments (8)

  • Lucky buggers. Wish I could just ignore the GMC and wait for the inevitable.

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  • There is an urgent need for the GMC to be held accountable for the mess that is revalidation. It's harming people by wasting resources and needs to be stopped before a serious tragedy occurs.

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  • There should definitely be some form of punishment for the people who brought in this unwarranted regulation. It's done enough damage already but the worst is yet to come.

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  • Revalidation was forced through without the consent and against the wishes of the medical profession despite numerous objections. Isn't it now time for an inquiry into how this happened and any abuse of power that may have taken place.?

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  • Not done anywhere else in the world because it is not felt necessary.
    Need I say more

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  • After making an enquiry about how I might satisfy the requirements for revalidation I have received an email giving me 28 days to decide whether to relinquish my licence to practice or to choose one of 2 alternatives. I work alone and do not belong to an organisation. I do not have a designated body or suitable person, so the only choice open seems to be to take an unspecified exam covering all of medicine "since a licence to practice is generic" to quote the GMC.
    I make a very modest income examining drivers and motorsport competitors. I am not involved in the treatment, investigation or management of patients.
    I qualified in 1975, worked as a GP for 20 years, in Occupational Health for the last 13 years and fitted in 12 years as a TA Civilian Medical Officer and 25 years aa medical officer in motorsport.

    Looks like I'm soon be joining the ranks of the unemployed.

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