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Covid-19 Primary Care Resources


Vitamin D



Further evidence is needed to assess whether vitamin D deficiency affects the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection

This information is sourced from NHS UK, NICE, Center for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM) and SAGE:

On 28th November the government announced that clinically extremely vulnerable people will be offered free vitamin D supplements for the winter

This information is sourced from NICE (December 2020):

  • Encourage people to follow UK government advice on taking a vitamin D               supplement to maintain bone and muscle health
  • For most people, 10 micrograms (400 units) of vitamin D a day will be enough to prevent serum 25(OH)D concentration from falling below 25 nmol/litre
  • Taking too high a dose of vitamin D over a long period of time could be harmful because it can cause hypercalcaemia
  • Do not offer a vitamin D supplement to people solely to prevent Covid-19, except as part of a clinical trial
  • Do not offer a vitamin D supplement to people solely to treat Covid-19, except as part of a clinical trial

This information is sourced from SAGE (October 2020):

  • Further evidence is needed to assess whether a vitamin D deficiency will impact any seasonal effects of SARS-CoV-2
  • There are some suggestions that those more likely to self-isolate, and vulnerable groups may have a higher incidence of vitamin D deficiency, potentially increasing the likelihood of adverse risks should they become infected

This information is sourced from NHS UK (August 2020):

  • It’s important to take vitamin D as you may have been indoors more than usual this year
  • You should take 10 micrograms (400 IU) of vitamin D a day between October and early March
  • There is currently not enough evidence to support taking vitamin D to prevent or treat coronavirus

This information is sourced from the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine (CEBM) (May 2020):