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A blood test to detect Alzheimer's, the 'five simple steps' to beat cancer and how giving cash to grown-up kids helps stave off depression

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines on Monday 10 March.

Health is the theme on several newspaper front pages this Monday morning, as the Telegraph splashes on a new blood test to detect Alzheimer’s and the Daily Express promises ‘five simple steps to beat cancer’.

US scientists said they found biomarkers in blood with which they were able to predict whether a person would go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease within the next three years with 90% accuracy.

The researchers will now try to use the findings in clinical trials where high-risk patients will be exposed to experimental treatments.

Meanwhile, if you want to ‘beat cancer’ there are only five things you need to do, according to the Express - and you may be able to predict which ones they are: quit smoking, lose weight, drink less alcohol and eat more fruit and vegetables.

Oliver Childs, of Cancer Research UK, said: ‘More than four in 10 cancer cases could be prevented by changes such as not smoking, keeping a healthy body weight and cutting back on booze. If a wholesale lifestyle makeover is too daunting, then one positive change can make a difference.’

And finally, the Times give the best ammunition yet to youngsters begging for help with that first-home deposit, as new research showed older people who help their grown-up children financially or with tasks around the house are happier and less likely to develop depression.

Lauren Bangerter, one of the researchers at Penn State University in Texas, said: ‘We usually view the elderly as needy, but our research shows that parents aged 60 and over are giving help to their children, and this support is often associated with lower rates of depression among the older adults.’

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