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Fruit juice bottles leave toddlers toothless, men spend almost £1,000 a year on alcohol, and olive oil mends a broken heart

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines.

Gap-toothed toddlers are on the rise, as Public Health England figures show ‘shocking’ levels of tooth decay are resulting from toddlers being given fruit juices and sugary drinks in their bottles.

The Guardian reports that the watchdog is calling for all under threes to only be given milk and water as figures showed 12% of three year olds had some teeth decay, leading to a sharp rise in tooth extractions.

Public Health England’s director of dental health Dr Sandra White said: ‘As a country, we should be ashamed.’

The Independent reports that the average Briton spends an average of £50,000 on alcohol in their life time, with drinkers in London spending a great deal more.

Macmillan Cancer Support found that we spend, on average, around £787 on alcohol per year, with men spending £934 and women spending £679. And the charity is calling on people to curtail their drinking for October.

Martin Lewis from Moneysavingexpert.com said: ‘It’s not just the price of buying alcohol… it’s the fact when we drink, we lose our spending inhibitions too – we all know the cheap night out that turns into a pocket-killer. Even going sober for a month could save you a significant amount.’

And finally, far from driving heart disease, according to the Daily Express a hefty dose of concentrated olive oil fats can actually rejuvenate diseased heart muscle and help it function more effectively.

Researchers from the University of Illinois found that giving rats with heart disease concentrate doses of oleate, caused an immediate change in heart activity and allowed hearts to overcome their difficulty in metabolising fatty acids for fuel.

Research director Dr Douglas Lewandowski said:  ‘This gives more proof to the idea that consuming healthy fats like oleate can have a significantly positive effect on cardiac health.’

 

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