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Government urged to stop NHS reorganisations, saliva test for Prostate and today's teenagers defy health stereotypes

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

The Royal College of Physicians has urged politicians to stop reorganising the NHS and start funding it properly, the Telegraph reports this morning.

The College’s manifesto targeting the party political conferences urges them to invest for a sustainable future for the NHS.

College chair Professor Jane Dacre said: ‘The NHS has suffered badly from the instability caused by constant reorganisation, and funding policies that have made it harder for hospitals, GPs and community services to work together to improve patient care.

‘The next government must commit to a long term vision that brings joined-up care to patients wherever they are.’

Elsewhere UK scientists are on the verge of a breakthrough in developing a saliva test to detect prostate cancer, the Daily Mail says.

Apparently researchers have identified the 100th gene closely linked to the disease and believe the test could be available in five years.

And according to another report in the Telegraph this morning, the nation’s teenagers are no longer a bunch of fornicating, drug-taking layabouts.

Latest statistics from the Health and Social Care Information Centre show fewer people under 18 have tried alcohol or drugs than in 2003, and there has been a sharp decline in teenage pregnancies in abortions since then.

Public health minister Jane Ellison said: ‘Trends in drinking, smoking and teenage pregnancy rates for young people are very encouraging. Young people who adopt healthy lifestyles early on can use them as a building block for success, using that resilience to get on in life.’

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