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Locum fees 'out of control', caesarean babies 23% more likely to develop autism, and investment in early Alzheimer's diagnosis through eye tests

The Mail on Sunday’s splash this weekend condemned –you guessed it - the ‘out of control’ fees paid to locum GPs, saying weekend locum shifts could net doctors £100k a year.

Sources contacted by the Mail on Sunday explain that the GP workforce crisis is behind the ‘crazy’ fees locums can earn, and says locums in Cornwall earned the highest rates.

The paper cites a consultant from recruitment firm CES locums who said: ‘I’ve a doctor who works every weekend. That’s the only job that she does. She probably clears between £7,000 and £8,000 a month.’

locum fees out of control

The Independent reports that children born through a caesarean section are 23% more likely to develop autism, although there is no evidence yet of a causal link and the absolute risk remains small.

Researchers from the University of Cork reviewed previous studies on the subject looking specifically for a correlation between surgical delivery method and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Eileen Curran, lead author of the report, said: ‘Given the accelerating rate of Caesarean section globally, this finding warrants further research of a more robust quality using larger populations to adjust for important potential confounders and explore potential causal mechanisms,’.

And finally Dundee university academics will lead a study on the potential for diagnosing Alzheimer’s early through eye tests, according to the BBC.

The study has received £1.1 million funding pot and will aim to further develop software which analyses images of the eye from multiple instruments to assess risk.

Lead researcher and professor of computational vision, Emanuele Trucco, ‘There is the promise of early warning in a non-invasive way and there is also the fact that we even might be able to use the test to differentiate between different types of dementia.’

 

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