Cookie policy notice

By continuing to use this site you agree to our cookies policy below:
Since 26 May 2011, the law now states that cookies on websites can ony be used with your specific consent. Cookies allow us to ensure that you enjoy the best browsing experience.

This site is intended for health professionals only

At the heart of general practice since 1960

Paperless NHS 'will save £4.4 billion', says Hunt

Health secretary Jeremy Hunt will challenge the NHS to adopt all of the aspects of the Government’s IT strategy and achieve a ‘paperless NHS’ by 2018 in a move that can save £4.4 billion, according to the Department of Health.

The estimated savings figures were presented in a DH-commissioned report by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) found that moves towards greater electronic prescribing and electronic patient records could improve care and allow health professionals to spend more time with patients, and as a result could save a potential £4.4 billion in the system. However, this was dependent on all aspects of the Government’s ‘IT revolution’ plans for the NHS being fully implemented, it added.

Hunt will spell out the measures to acheive these savings at the Policy Exchange think tank today, most of which he hopes to see in place by March 2015. He will call for: patients to be given online access to their own health records held by their GPs; adoption of paperless referrals, with GPs being able to end out emails rather than letters when referring a patient to hospital; plans to enable secure linking of electronic health and care records wherever they are held, which will follow individuals, with their consent, to any part of the NHS or social care system; and, by April 2018, for digital information to be fully available across NHS and social care services.

Mr Hunt will say: ‘The NHS cannot be the last man standing as the rest of the economy embraces the technology revolution. It is crazy that ambulance drivers cannot access a full medical history of someone they are picking up in an emergency - and that GPs and hospitals still struggle to share digital records.

‘Previous attempts to crack this became a top down project akin to building an aircraft carrier. We need to learn those lessons - and in particular avoid the pitfalls of a hugely complex, centrally specified approach. Only with world class information systems will the NHS deliver world class care.’

PwC warned that the success of the rollout will be dependent on a will to invest in one-off technology as well as new ways of working, the willingness of system bodies to adopt the technology and there being incentives to adopt IT, especially when it requires working in coordination with other parts of the system.

However, Dr Paul Cundy, chair of the GPC’s IT subcommittee and a GP in Wimbledon, south London, branded the savings estimations as ‘complete rubbish’.

He said: ‘It is complete rubbish. No one has ever saved any money by implementing an IT system. And again, whoever has had an IT system which has been sustained by a single, one-off investment? They require significant running costs. These are all good things, and GPs welcome the vast majority of them. But don’t let anyone think that these will result in saved money. And they rarely save time. But don’t get me wrong, what it will do is make the NHS more efficient and making the NHS more efficient is the more realistic agenda than saving money.’

However, he added: ‘General practice is already very well computerised so it is not general practice that needs it, it is secondary care that needs it. What we need is electronic clinical communication, a full rollout of the GP-to-GP programme [to transfer records between practices], and we need secondary care to get as computer-enabled as primary care is, because they are sending us complete rubbish.’

The DH is proposing for a new DES on patient online access to form part of the 2013/14 GP contract. Subject to consultation, the plans are expected to be implemented from 1 April despite GPC warnings that online access to patient records may lead to them ending up in the wrong hands.

Readers' comments (8)

  • There is NO WAY I would ever consent to my records being online. I simply would not trust it.

    Every GP should advise their patients the same.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • How are we going to magic this out of thin air? How much will this cost? Who guarantees online security? When have over-ambitious IT projects by Gov depts ever saved money! They always run over budget and fail to deliver. Just wait a few months until we get another shiny new health secretary with another idiotic idea. Oh, and what happened to out-sourcing reception tasks/appts to call centres in India?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • here we go again.i had been counting the days until another health secretary falls for yet another shiny and expensive report by the likes of PWC/KPMG/McK and wants to yet again blow resources on an IT program. why? because they tell him so. and they have told others the same nonsense before.Oh, I hear him say: this shall not be the same top heavy approach as last time....haha. get real my friend. you know no more about health and health policy than the check out girl at my local supermarket, Mr Hunt! throw out the glizzy report brigade from whitehall and you will already have your savings

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Fascinating reading from the cuting edge of the dark ages

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Nhsfatcat

    When is anyone going to demand that to use the health service you present a health card which has all your data on and can be updated by NHS services. Your GP practice holds the backup as its your 'local' service. No centrally held online accessible record to stop the security issues (I'm not a Luddite but have serious doubts that anything the size of the NHS is secure) no card -no service (except dire emergency which is proven not to require central records or use them) foreign and non -NHS patients easily identified, and a bit of patient responsibility thrown in.
    Add a prescription to the card, patient trots off to chemist, swipe and its done. Next time I see them I'll know if they picked up meds, attended A&E, another GP walk etc all linked up nicely!
    I cannot access my shopping without handing over a card or cash- nhs make it so! No card or cash -tough!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I would have thought the report would read

    Now we have made up some large number in theoretical savings please can we have a fat contract to lead its implementation. Aslong as we dont have to ever deliver the reported savings. Thanks PwC

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Integrated care records are well overdue. I like the
    card idea Simon.
    It's time for the government to invest on decent kit
    and make it happen. I don't know how much will
    be saved financially but time definitely will be and time to care with compassion and communicate will be back.
    Jeremy next time you want to commission a report
    how about you ask Primary Care- I'm sure we will
    be a bargain compared to PCW !!!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Your are a genius, Mr Hunt!

    Will you be personally made accountable for every Billion that isn't saved?

    Ah, no, thought so...

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

IMPORTANT: On Wednesday 7 December 2016, we implemented a new log in system, and if you have not updated your details you may experience difficulties logging in. Update your details here. Only GMC-registered doctors are able to comment on this site.