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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Thousands recalled over virus risk, hospital staff hands 'cleaner in the morning' and how pot may shrink the brain

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

NHS England has recalled 22,000 patients of one dentist in Nottinghamshire to check them for blood-borne viruses, after the dentist was suspended, the BBC reports.

Experts have recommended all the dentist’s patients are screened after whistleblower reports led to cameras being installed in the practice, although they said the risk is ‘low’.

The dentist, who is not HIV positive, treated patients in Nottingham over a 32-year period.

The Telegraph suggests patients should make sure they go to hospital in the morning if they want to be treated by staff with clean hands.

Apparently long days on wards mean doctors are less likely to comply with hand hygiene rules towards the end of a shift.

And finally, the Independent reports that marijuana smokers have ‘significantly less volume’ in their orbitofrontal cortex, the part of the brain devoted to reward, motivation and addictive behaviour.

But the snapshot survey of around 110 participants, 48 of them regular marijuana users, also found that drug users had significantly ‘higher functional and structural connectivity’ which they suggest is a compensatory adaptation.

However, the University of Texas study notes that, because the orbitofrontal cortex controls addictive behaviour, it is possible the subjects simply shared the reduced size trait.

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