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Time to act

One of society's lost children makes his mark in the latest surreal observation from Through the K Hole

One of society's lost children makes his mark in the latest surreal observation from Through the K Hole

 

 



The city slowly opened its eyes, bleary, red rimmed and metal shuttered. As the cold slate-grey morning light fingered its way through the streets he scuffed out some of the flaking masonery with the toe of his boot to gain a better purchase. He managed to haul himself over to a nearby ledge, knuckles whitening with the effort. A steady percussion of rainwater beat down onto his black hoody, it was drawn tightly around his face and was as sleek as seal skin.

He felt abused by society, forgotten, one of its lost children and he was here to make his mark. He took out a spray can from the back pocket of his jeans, shook it and fumed out a couple of test squirts.

As he pressed his homemade template against the wall a police car ghosted underneath him, it sent out pulses of electric-blue light, flash-bulbing his villainous shadow. The car slowed and rolled up alongside a girl with crack-pipe legs and short leather skirt who had been working the streets all night. He watched with relief as the car sped off.

People like him had been vilified, he was Punch in a piece of cheap travelling theatre, castigated and booed off the stage like a modern day Claudius. It was time to act.

Finally, satisfied with the result, he jumped off the ledge. He was higher than he thought and he bit his tongue and turned his ankle on the way down. He made his way back as fast as he could, half-running, half-limping through the morning traffic.

Spitting out blood and washing his hands of spray paint he looked out of his window and admired his work. It wasn't art, it was animal scenting, his urban anal gland had sprayed 'No to 65' and 'Down with the health bill' in diamond cutting letters across the side of the neighbouring Darzi Clinic.

The receptionist knocked on his door 'Doctor, your first patient is ready to see you'.

As he shook his patient's hand, the bitter sentiments that he'd pissed up the side of a crazy idea were already being washed off in the rain.

Dr Kevin Hinkley is a GP in Aberdeen. Written in response to: BMA reserves right to strike over NHS reforms

Click here for more from Through the K hole Through the K hole

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