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Two doctors face GMC complaints relating to industrial action

Exclusive: Two doctors could face being investigated by the GMC after taking part in the day of action over pensions on the 21 June, Pulse can reveal.

The GMC has received complaints about two doctors relating to taking industrial action last month, but the regulator would not confirm whether it would take any further action against the doctors involved.

Before the day of action, the GMC said it would only intervene if industrial action by doctors compromised patient safety, but the regulator refused for ‘confidentiality reasons' to give further details about the seriousness of the two complaints, or whether they had informed the doctors about the allegations made against them.

The complaints against the doctors will be made public if the GMC decides a warning or a referral for a fitness to practise hearing is the appropriate course of action.

A GMC spokesperson told Pulse: ‘We have received two complaints about doctors relating to industrial action on 21 June.'

Speaking to Pulse before the day of action, Niall Dickson, GMC chief executive said it would only take action if patients were harmed or put at risk.

He said: 'The decision by the BMA Council to take industrial action is a matter for them. We have no role in relations between doctors and their employers.'

‘Our job is to protect patients and provide advice and support for doctors and our guidance is clear – a doctor's first duty is to his or her patient.'

'Doctors must make sure arrangements are in place to care for their patients before the action on the 21 June. As the BMA have made clear patient safety must come first - their actions must not harm patients or put them at risk.'

'We recognise that the circumstances facing each doctor will be different – it will therefore be a matter for each individual to assess their own situation and make sure they follow this guidance.'

If investigated the doctors could be hit with a warning, agreed undertakings, or a referral to the Medical Practitioners Tribunal Service for a fitness to practise hearing if the case is not dropped.

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