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DDRB instructed not to suggest salaried GP pay rise practices can’t afford

APMS

The Government has asked the Review Body on Doctors’ and Dentists Remuneration (DDRB) to take into account ‘affordability’ for practices when recommending a salaried GP pay rise for next year.

In its remit letter for the DDRB for the 2022/23 financial year, health secretary Sajid Javid said the pay of independent contractor GPs should not be considered as part of the review because they ‘remain subject’ the the five-year pay agreement struck between NHS England and the BMA.

However, he added: ‘We do, however, invite you to make recommendations on uplifts to the maximum and minimum of the salaried [GP] pay scales.’

But he said that: ‘As ever, recommendations will need to be informed by affordability and the fixed contract resources available to practices under the five-year GP contract.’

The five-year GP contract for England’s GPs, entered into in 2019/20, aimed to give GP partners a 2% year-on-year pay increase.

However for the current financial year, the Government accepted a DDRB recommendation for salaried GPs to receive a 3% pay rise.

At the time, the BMA commented that this was an ’empty promise’ without additional funding for GP practices to pay for it.

The Government had initially proposed a 1% pay increase for doctors in March this year.

Meanwhile, Welsh GP contract negotiations for 2021/22 concluded at the end of last month, with all GPs to receive a 3% pay rise backdated to 1 April. The previous year, Welsh GPs received 2.8% pay rise.

Last month, the England LMCs conference called on the BMA to negotiate a new GP contract, with over half of delegates expressing support for a fee-for-service contract model.

READERS' COMMENTS [7]

Dr N 7 December, 2021 7:15 am

I dont recall the five year pay agreement including funding salaried GP pay rises.

Well only 35% of you lot even bothered voting on the BMA ballot for industrial action so welcome to the shaftfest.

Bonglim Bong 7 December, 2021 2:49 pm

i have seen the turnout figure of 35% before – but how did they work it out?

It was one vote per practice. So does that mean that 35% of practices had a reply on their behalf – and 65% didn’t?
And how do they know how many of those practices don’t have any GP partners who are members of the BMA?

paul cundy 7 December, 2021 3:52 pm

Dear All,
Would that allow for “catch up” of the 1% shortfall from last year to be built in?
Regards
Paul C

David Church 7 December, 2021 4:15 pm

It should have been one vote per GP, not per practice.
I do hope BMA can confirm that they invited EVERY GP to vote.
This appears to be both an attempt to cause division amongst the Profession by pitting Principals and Salaried GPs against each other, and also an indication that the DDRB is just not independent and no longer fit for service.

David Bush 7 December, 2021 4:42 pm

The DDRB should not advise on salaried GP’s pay. Those GPs are not paid by the Government, to whom the DDRB report. Realistically market forces determine the pay of salaried GPs which is how it should be.

David jenkins 7 December, 2021 4:56 pm

most of the GP partners that i know have had a shit time during covid. jo public believes they are having a lie in/playing golf/ down the pub – anywhere except in work. the politicians seem to think the same, as does the daily wail etc etc etc.

in fact, they have been working their genitals off trying to keep everyone safe and well, with very little thanks in some cases

for this reason, as a locum, i want to stress that I WON’T BE INCREASING FEES FOR “NORMAL” PRACTICES.

however, for bean counters, politicians, and those at the top in the welsh assembly who believe they are calling the shots – i.e. the (mis)managed practices, of which there are an abundance in wales – the same ones who apply IR35 – i shall expect a 3% uplift.

David jenkins 7 December, 2021 5:12 pm

………….and if i don’t get a 3% uplift, they can expect a 3% DOWNLIFT in the work i do for the same fee !