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At the heart of general practice since 1960

Average GP earnings drop by more than 1%, official statistics reveal

Average earnings across all types of GPs in England fell by 1.2%, from £91,200 to £90,100, according to the latest data.

The official publication from NHS Digital, for the year 2015/16, showed the average GP partner earned £101,300 after expenses, down by a not statistically significant 0.05%.

At the same time, the average income for salaried GPs reduced by 1.5% to £55,800.

The only group to see their earnings increase in 2015/16 were partners in GMS-contracted practices, who saw a rise of 1.8%. However for their PMS counterparts, earnings decreased by 1.9%.

Chair of the BMA’s GP committee Dr Richard Vautrey told Pulse it was 'unacceptable' that GP pay was falling, adding it was 'no wonder' young GPs were not choosing the profession while older doctors ‘are retiring as soon as they can’.

Dr Vautrey pointed out the data had proved the GPC right when they raised concerns back in 2015 that the Government’s pledge of a 1% pay uplift in 2015 would fall well short.

At the time, the Department of Health accepted recommendations by the Review Body on Doctors' and Dentists' Remuneration (DDRB) to increase practice funding by 1.16%.

Dr Vautrey said: 'It is completely unacceptable at a time when there is growing and justified anger around the Government's pay cap.

'It shows the reality for GPs is that their pay is going backwards rather than a 1% pay uplift.'

GP partner earnings and expenses 2002-2016

Changes in real terms average gross earnings, expenses and income before tax by practice type for GMS and PMS contractor GPs in the UK

Source: NHS Digital

 

Readers' comments (13)

  • It's a lot bigger cut when inflation is taken into account.
    But the true inflation figure is difficult to find out and often underestimated - especially CPI

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  • it is clearly much better to follow a hospital career at present

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  • As a self employed independent contractor I don't understand the obsession with what I earn?
    The reality is if profits fall altruistic work stops to be replaced by work that pays. Not funded not done.

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  • Exactly Dr McGilligan.

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  • Vinci Ho

    Yes , we are in very extraordinary and historic circumstances. The inflation of 2.9% , clearly above wage rise of 2.1% , is largely down to suppressed , instead of depreciated , Sterling because of the uncertainties from Brexit. Hence , this inflation is not really entirely reflective of normal economic cycles.
    Unemployment rate is even lower at 4.3% . It simply means many people are working in relatively low pay jobs. It is not easy to recruit 'good' candidates as many are moving from job to job easily. I certainly found that was the case myself as an employer.
    Will Brexit cause even lower unemployment rate as EU employees leaving the country ? Problem is overall productivity, hence ,economic growth .
    I always believe that private sector always look upon how the government behaves as far as wage rise in public sector is concerned.Hence , the cap of 1% pay rise was a treachery.
    Will be interested to see the next round of interest rate discussions amongst the committee members in Nank of England......
    If Harvey and Irma were vicious causing acute agonies , Brexit is a chronic pain syndrome.,...

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  • Vinci Ho

    Correction
    Bank of England

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  • If we had an effective union they would be demanding we did 1.2% less work. As it is average workload has increased 25% as we cannot find anyone to replace our retired partner, scarcely a locum around either!!

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  • 30% would be a more realistic figure - NHS Digital is so corrupt that it is inaccessible for mortal GPs when an explanation is requested why it reduces your list size by 30 patients when i1 patient leaves and adds only 1 patient when 7 patients join.
    NHSE in Kent seems to be so embarrassed by it's behaviour that it refuses to pass on email explanations from NHS Digital to affected GPs.
    Don't trust fake news from NHS Digital or NHSE - they out trump even JH. The lack of transparency would shame the Cosa Nostra at lease in Kent and Medway.

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  • Vinci Ho

    You see
    The defeat of the government in House of Commons on the two Labour's motions; lifting the NHS pay cap and halting the rise of tuition fees, demonstrated the different circumstances and predicament our common enemy is under . Although the passing of these motions are not policy-binding, this is a crack in the stone letting light go through. The 'confidence and supply' agreement with DUP, with a price tag of £1 billion , clearly does not 'supply' universally. DUP had voted with Labour this evening .
    As I said , this battle is a long one and our representatives should be alert and quick to respond to these changes as far as tackling our enemy is concerned. Play the right mind game and your enemy, under the 'right' conditions, will be imperilled......

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  • Is this standardised by whole time equivalent?

    If GPs are becoming more part-time (which they are) is that taken into account e.g. working 10% less hours for flat pay is a pay rise...

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