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Call for free social care at end of life, contraceptive pill Crohn's link and the restaurant chains giving children a salt overload

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

MPs have called for people coming to the end of life to receive free social care, helping more people to die at home if they want to, reports the BBC.

The Commons Health Committee said it wants the Government to ensure no-one dies in hospital, rather than at home, ‘for want of a social care package of support’.

Care minister Norman Lamb said: ‘We are looking carefully at the costs and benefits of this policy, but we know that thanks to the hard work of health and care staff and carers, many people already receive good end-of-life care.’

Elsewhere, The Telegraph reports there could be a link between the ‘huge upsurge’ in Crohn’s disease over the past 50 years and the ‘explosion’ in contraceptive use among women since the 60s.

Apparently researchers have found women who took the contraceptive pill for five years or longer had three times the usual risk of developing Crohn’s disease - although they stressed the risk was largely confined to women with a genetic predisposition to the disease.

Dr Simon Anderson, a consultant gastroenterologist at London Bridge hospital, said: ‘If you have a family history of Crohn’s I would advise against starting on the Pill.’

Lastly, The Times reports that restaurant chains are guilty of putting huge amounts of salt into children’s meals - in some cases twice the daily recommended intake in one go.

The research from the group Consensus Action on Salt and Health (CASH) showed one veggie burger contained 4.64g of salt - 232% of a toddler’s daily salt allowance.

Sonia Pombo, a nutritionist at CASH, said: ‘We are all eating too much salt and it’s a scandal that very few restaurants are taking salt reduction seriously - especially when the health of our children is at risk. More needs to be done and action taken now.’

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