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Care homes 'cutting corners', work or breed conundrum and babies in bubbles

Our roundup of health news headlines on Friday 28 January.

By Laura Passi

Our roundup of health news headlines on Friday 28 January.

Dame Jo Williams the chair of the CQC has warns today that the ‘Dire state of care homes for the elderly is only going to get worse'. The Independent reports that financial constraints will mean that care home owners will look to ‘cut corners', which could see the decline in staff training, building maintenance and activities for the residents. She also said the picture is worse in the south east because a ‘more transitory work force' lack the loyalty to their employers shown in other parts of the country.

Front page of the Daily Mail today warns ‘Don't wait too long for a baby', because women are ‘SIX times more likely to suffer from fertility problems when 35 than at 25'. Thank you for the facts but can we guess what the paper cites as a cause for delaying parenthood…? ‘More and more women pursuing careers', which doesn't appear to be backed up by any research at all. Anyone would think that the Mail is trying to scare women into not pursuing careers… Surely not.

Talking of high flyers (of both sexes), the Mirror says that ‘high-flyers are bigger boozers' than their ‘blue-collared' counterparts. This is according to a survey from the Office for National Statistics.

Returning to babies, researchers at Great Ormond Street Hospital and Newcastle General Hospital, have found that early detection of the immune condition 'baby in a bubble' can save lives, as it leads to early treatment. The Daily Telegraph reports their recommendation that every child born in England should be tested for the condition, which ‘would cost around £3.5m.'

Daily digest

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