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The role of melatonin in sleep

 



Melatonin binds to specific receptors (MT1, MT2) in the brain, which promote sleep and helps reset the phase of the biological clock.1 Administering melatonin during the day increases fatigue, enhances sleepiness and modifies CNS activity in preparation for sleep. A number of tissues express MT receptors – including blood vessels, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, kidney and bladder, ovary, testis, prostate, skin and the immune system.2 This profile allows melatonin to modulate circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues and organs.

Normal profile of melatonin

 


How can Circadin® (prolonged release melatonin) help support the natural biological clock?

Circadin simply helps restore the natural rhythm of sleep by mimicking the effects of melatonin in the body.3,4 As a 2mg prolonged-release melatonin formulation, Circadin is indicated as monotherapy for the short-term treatment of primary insomnia characterised by poor quality of sleep in patients who are aged 55 or over.5 It helps restore the natural sleep rhythm by increasing the body's own level of this naturally occurring hormone at night.4 Circadin can be prescribed for up to 13 weeks, if required.5

This is a promotional feature article that has been produced by Lundbeck Ltd.

Prescribing information

Graph 1 Text Circadin

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