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'Good cop' enzymes in cancerous cells, Care Bill architect warns reforms could be a 'cruel deception' if not adequately funded and a purple tomato with double the shelf life of a red one

Enzymes released by cancerous cells have a protective function as they can attack the tumour, said researchers from the University of Anglia.

Their study found the MMP-8 enzyme sent a signal to the immune system to attack the tumour. They said the enzyme could be seen as a ‘good cop’ rather than a bad guy.

Patients whose breast tumours have more of this enzyme seemed to attack the tumour more.

Cancer Research UK said the research provided ‘very early clues’ as to how the enzyme might recruit cells to fight breast cancer.

The Telegraph reports that that Government promises to reform the elderly care system might be a ‘cruel deception’ if they don’t have the cash to back up their promises, one of the architects of the social care reforms has warned.

Lord Warner, a former Labour health minister who designed the cap on nursing home fees, said: ‘Promising a brave new future under this Bill without adequate funding for implementing the new system would be a cruel deception to inflict on many vulnerable people’.

He added that lack of funding for social care services was putting enormous strain on NHS accident and emergency services.

Currently about 40,000 people a year are forced to sell their homes to cover the bills. One in ten faces care fees of more than £100,000.

But ministers warned of ‘the realities’ facing the Treasury and said the social care system could not be improved by throwing money at it.

Over at the Daily Mail we find news of a purple tomato with double the shelf life of the red ones.

Scientists have found that adding a compound high in antioxidants, anthocyanin, to purple GM tomatoes can more than double the shelf life of the world most popular fruit from 21 to 48 days.

The pigment slows down the over-ripening process that leads to rotting and softening - creating a better taste.

Previous studies on purple GM tomatoes have shown those enriched in anthocyanin prolongs the life of cancer-prone mice.

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