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Sitting women increase cancer risk, women disrespected in hospital and a record number of diabetic amputations

A round-up of the morning’s health news headlines

Women who stay seated for more than six hours a day increase their risk of breast, ovary or bone marrow tumours, reports the Daily Mail.

Researchers for the American Cancer Society discovered that leisure sitting was linked to a 10% higher risk of cancer for women – but did not affect men.

The authors said: ‘Longer leisure time spent sitting was associated with a higher risk of total cancer risk in women, and specifically with multiple myeloma [bone marrow cancer], breast cancer, and ovarian cancers.’

A fifth of hospital patients in England are not always treated with respect and dignity, according to a wide-ranging survey, reports the BBC.

Analysis of data from a 2012 poll also found that poor or inconsistent care was more likely to be experienced by women as well as the over-80s.

The report, carried out by the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the LSE, found that the risks were also higher for those with a long-standing illness or disability while patients in hospital for a long period, or who stayed in three or more wards, were at an even greater risk.

Finally, an article in theGuardian reveals that a record 135 people a week are having to undergo amputations because of diabetes.

According to previously unpublished figures from Public Health England (PHE) 18,080 patients with diabetes underwent an amputation of some sort between 2007 and 2010 – an average of 116 a week.

However, the figures rose to 21,125 in 2011-14 – an average of 135 a week, according to data obtained by the charity Diabetes UK.

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